why do my teeth hurt after flying

why do my teeth hurt after flying

I’m not sure if it’s the change in pressure or what, but every time I fly, my teeth start hurting afterwards. It’s not a sharp pain, but more of a dull ache. Does anyone else experience this? If so, please let me know what you do to alleviate the pain.

Teeth and flying – the connection


If you experience teeth pain after a flight, you’re not alone. It’s a surprisingly common condition, and there are a few different theories about why it happens.

One possibility is that the change in air pressure can cause pain in your teeth and jaw. Another is that the dry air in the cabin dries out your sinuses, which can lead to pain in your teeth.

There are a few things you can do to help prevent or relieve pain in your teeth when flying:
-Drink plenty of water during the flight to keep your mouth moist.
-Chew gum or suck on hard candy to help equalize the pressure in your sinuses.
-Avoid chewing gum or eating hard candy while landing, as this can increase the pressure in your sinuses and make the pain worse.
-If you have sensitive teeth, use a toothpaste for sensitive teeth before flying.

Why do teeth hurt after flying?

There are a few reasons why your teeth might hurt after flying. The change in air pressure can cause pain in your sinuses, which can also be felt in your teeth. Additionally, dehydration can cause your teeth to feel sensitive. The dry air on planes can also contribute to dehydration. To avoid tooth pain while flying, drink plenty of water and chew gum to keep your mouth hydrated. You may also want to take a pain reliever before takeoff.

How can I prevent teeth pain after flying?

There are a few things you can do to help prevent teeth pain after flying:
-Drink plenty of fluids to stay hydrated.
-Chew gum or suck on hard candy to keep your ears from popping.
-Avoid chewing gum or eating hard candy while flying, as this can put pressure on your teeth and jaw.
-Try over-the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen or acetaminophen if you start to feel pain.

How can I treat teeth pain after flying?

There are a few things that can cause your teeth to hurt after flying. The change in air pressure can cause pain in your teeth and jaw. The dry air on the plane can also cause your teeth to hurt. To help relieve the pain, you can drink lots of water and chew gum. You can also try over-the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen or acetaminophen. If the pain is severe, you should see a dentist.

What are the long-term effects of teeth pain after flying?

There is no definitive answer to this question as the effects of teeth pain after flying can vary depending on the individual. However, some possible long-term effects of teeth pain after flying include:

-Increased sensitivity to hot or cold temperatures
-Pain when chewing or biting
-Jaw pain or TMJ (temporomandibular joint) disorders
-Headaches or migraines
-Ear pain

Is there a cure for teeth pain after flying?


If you have teeth pain after flying, you’re not alone. Many people experience this phenomenon, which is caused by a change in air pressure. When the plane takes off, the air pressure inside the cabin decreases. This decrease in pressure can cause sharp pains in your teeth.

The good news is that there are a few things you can do to ease the pain. Chewing gum or sucking on hard candy can help by stimulating saliva production. Saliva helps to equalize the pressure in your mouth and can reduce the pain. You can also try swishing water around your mouth before takeoff and landing. Swishing will help to loosen any food particles that may be causing pain.

If you regularly experience teeth pain after flying, you may want to consult with a dentist to see if there is anything else that can be done to help ease the pain.

Are there any risks associated with teeth pain after flying?


There are a few risks associated with teeth pain after flying. The most common is dehydration, which can cause the sensitive tissues in your mouth to become irritated. Drinking plenty of fluids during your flight and after you land will help to prevent this.

Another risk is sinus pressure. When the air pressure in the cabin changes, it can put pressure on the sinuses, which can cause pain in the teeth. This is more likely to happen if you have a cold or allergies. Taking a decongestant before your flight can help to prevent this.

Finally, if you have TMJ, you may be more likely to experience pain in your teeth after flying. This is because the change in air pressure can put additional stress on the temporomandibular joint, which can aggravate symptoms.

What can I do to prevent teeth pain after flying in the future?

There are a few things you can do to help prevent teeth pain after flying:

-Chew gum: Chewing gum during takeoff and landing can help equalize the pressure in your sinuses and prevent pain in your teeth.
-Drink plenty of water: Drinking water helps keep your sinuses hydrated, which can also help reduce pressure and pain.
-Avoid caffeine and alcohol: Caffeine and alcohol can both contribute to dehydration, which can make any sinus pain worse.
-Use a nasal spray: A saline nasal spray can help keep your sinuses hydrated and lessen the chance of pain.
-See a dentist: If you regularly experience pain in your teeth after flying, it’s a good idea to see a dentist. They can check for any underlying problems that may be causing the pain.

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